Posted in Movies - General

Chekka Chivantha Vaanam (CCV)


What if the battle isn’t always between good and evil?
What happens when evil permeates into good and what’s left is only shades of evil? 

Chekka

In a movie based on an abrasive story about a family horrifically transformed after the death of its patriarch who is a wealthy gangster, the writers (Mani Ratnam and Siva Ananth) and the director (Mani Ratnam) adequately prepare you for the gory twists and turns the movie is going to take, after a shocking opening scene where there is a failed assassination attempt on the patriarch and his wife.

Chekka Chivantha Vaanam is a new kind of Mani Ratnam film. The ‘Mani-isms’ we are used to seeing perhaps have gotten a reboot. Mani’s treatment of songs has entered a completely new and a complex territory. There is less of poetry in any given scene, as the scenes are not dwelling on moments, instead they define phases of stories and hence Mani couldn’t afford to spend time on waxing poetry. There are many details, at first, seem untold. When I watched the movie the second time, I realized that they were not left untold, but were meant to be left intentionally open for audience’s interpretation, as the director wants to move the story forward in the quickest way possible. So, do these all make CCV a film that is very “Un-Mani-Ratnam”? The answer is yes, if you like to box creativity. The answer is no, if you believe in an artist’s creativity manifesting into different forms or in it simply evolving.

Arvind Swamy, Arun Vijay, and STR are three brothers. They play these characters that are your manly men, riding high on Testosterone with a capital “T”. They have strong women in their respective lives – Jyohika, Aishwarya, and Dayana. When their father, Prakash Raj and mother, Jayasudha, escape an assassination attempt on their lives, the brothers, two of them living outside the country, are forced to get together in Chennai. As they help comfort their parents, an opportunity to reassess their priorities arise, and along with it a suspicion on who could have tried killing their father creeps in. The stage is set for a power struggle, if and when a vacuum gets created after the father dies.

We are also introduced to an outsider, Vijay Sethupathi, a cop, serving suspension of his duties. He is a childhood friend of Arvind Swamy and is fully aware of the family’s criminal dealings, and is ok to share a plate of ‘upma’ or a cup of tea with them, without any guilt. The script sort of skates over these characters and their backgrounds unwaveringly, and yet, we don’t feel lost or disconnected. So, it’s left to the actors, then, to keep us close to the movie, and none of them shirks away from that task of injecting the needed intellect and emotion to the characters. AR Rahman’s powerful background score defines the underlying mood of the film, frame by farme.

I was quite unsure of my reaction to the movie the first time around because I was unsure if I had missed any character layering, given that the story is straightforward, barring the somewhat predictable plot twists. When I watched it the second time, I was able to appreciate the nuances of the characters much better. I could understand why Mani and Siva may have made some choices in their character portrayal. Given the nature of the “plot forwards”, and because of the deliberate attempt to downplay and not dramatize the bonding between the characters, there is very little emotionally, for the audience to latch onto, which works in the movie’s favor when it comes to the final act.

The final act of the movie is almost like a “purge”. A bloodbath of vengeance, shot aesthetically in a visually arresting landscape (Gandhikota Canyon in Kadappa district, Andhra Pradesh), set to hues of red, all over. From the phosphorus rich red soil to the bullfinch sky showcasing a sunset, from blood oozing out of dead bodies to the redness arising from anger, the director of cinematography Santhosh Sivan and Mani Ratnam, make sure that there is poetic justice meted out to the title of the movie. With AR Rahman’s guitar riff screaming to some powerful lyrics of Vairamuthu, one ends up walking out of the theater rooting for the right character…albeit as an afterthought.

What if the battle isn’t always between good and evil?
What happens when evil permeates into good and what’s left is only shades of evil? 

தப்பு தப்பா தப்புங்க செஞ்சு
தப்பு அறிஞ்சும் தப்புங்க செஞ்சு
செவந்து போச்சு நெஞ்சு

[Conscious but repeated violent deeds

Eventually result in bloodied souls]

 

Author:

Besides fantasizing about being a Peter Gibbons at least for a couple of days at my work, I think I have a long way to go to realize some of the other fantasies. But like any ambitious man out there, I will get there! Note: All views expressed in this blog are mine alone and have got nothing to do with my company Cogent IBS, Inc., its employees or any of its affiliates.

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